20 things that will surprise first-time visitors

IT’S NOT SO CLOSE TO ULURU

Want to tick off Alice Springs and Uluru on the same trip? Just a warning: Uluru is almost 500 kilometers from Alice. You can book a coach transfer with AAT Kings, and ChartAir offers weekly flights between the two. Alternatively, if you want to drive yourself, it’s a half-day tour on tarmac roads.

IT’S COLDER THAN YOU THINK

The Red Center is famous for its hot summers, but the winters can be surprisingly chilly. Although daytime temperatures hover around 20 degrees, nighttime temperatures can dip as much as five degrees.

SO COLD, IN FACT, THAT IT HAS A FESTIVAL DEDICATED TO BEANIES

For 25 years, the Beanie Festival has celebrated this humble headgear, with thousands of hand-knit beanies for sale, wearable artwork on display, and all proceeds going to Indigenous community programs.

YOU CAN DRINK A GOOD COFFEE…

The bakery is a small local family business that makes real sourdough and artisan breads, pastries made with real butter, twice-baked almond croissants, donuts with artisan fillings, creative savory pastries and freshly baked pies using premium local meats and vegetables.  , gourmet sandwiches.  PR image provided for Traveler.  Verify reuse.  20 things that will surprise new visitors to the Ute Junker story of Alice Springs.  Tourism NT Pictures

Photo: NT Tourism

Head to the Todd pedestrian mall to visit The Bakery (above), for flat whites and long blacks alongside homemade sourdough sandwiches, pies and pastries, or slip into an arcade to find page 27. There’s always a line for weekend brunch at this cafe-style alleyway where options include shakshuka and eggs Benedict.

… BUT MONITOR OPENING HOURS

Like many small towns, Alice’s businesses operate on a limited schedule. If you plan to visit a particular business, check if it will be open before you go. More businesses are open later in the week, Thursday through Friday; many of them open around 10 or 11 a.m., and some close again mid-afternoon.

THIS IS A HUB FOR INDIGENOUS ART

The Papunya Tula style of painting derives directly from the artists knowledge of traditional body and sand painting associated with the ceremony.  PR image provided for Traveler.  Verify reuse.  20 things that will surprise new visitors to the Ute Junker story of Alice Springs.  Tourism NT Pictures

Photo: NT Tourism

Looking to experience amazing art? Head to the Papunya Tula Gallery (above) or the Yubu Napa Art Gallery, where the owners know the artists personally, or browse the extensive collection at the Araluen Arts Centre, which includes paintings by greats like Albert Namatjira and Clifford Tjapaltjari Opossum. See papunyatula.com.au; yubunapa.com; araluenartscentre.nt.gov.au

AND NOT JUST PAINTING

Stop at Tjanpi Desert Weavers, where women from 26 different remote communities create striking contemporary works of art woven from native grasses. Other interesting shops are available in the Aboriginal Fabrics Gallery, where you can buy lengths of brightly printed materials or purchase a handful of towels, pillowcases or scarves. See tjanpi.com.au; aboriginalfabrics.com.au

THERE’S ALSO AMAZING ROCK ART

Head to Emily and Jessie Gaps or the remarkable N’Dhala Gorge, which contains over 6,000 ancient carvings, including petroglyphs believed to be 10,000 years old.

THIS IS THE HOME OF THE REAL “KANGAROO DUNDEE”

Thousands of fans around the world follow the adventures of Chris Barnes’ Kangaroo Sanctuary, home to injured and orphaned kangaroos. Reservations are essential for sunset tours. See kangarooosanctuary.com

YOU CAN DO ONE OF OUR GREATEST WALKS

Visitors walking along the Larapinta Trail.

Ranked as one of the top 20 treks on the planet, the Larapinta Trail is a 223 kilometer trail that follows the rocky spine of the West MacDonnell Ranges from Alice Springs Telegraph Station to Mount Sonder.  Challenge yourself to hike the entire trail or tackle one of its 12 sections, all of which vary in difficulty and length.  PR image provided for Traveler.  Northern Territory Tourism.  ”  data-src=”http://www.smh.com.au/content/dam/images/h/1/w/y/r/0/image.imgtype.articleLeadwide.620×349.png/1657694224087.png” title=”” width=”100%”/> </p>
<p><cite><i>Photo: NT Tourism</i></cite></p>
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<p>The Alice is the starting point for the Larapinta Trail, a 223 km trek through some of our most spectacular scenery.  The full trek takes 12 days, but companies such as World Expeditions and Intrepid offer shorter guided treks that focus on the more scenic sections.</p>
<p><strong>OR BOARD ON ONE OF OUR GRAND RAIL TRIPS </strong></p>
<p>If you like the idea of ​​exploring the hinterland aboard an elegant sleeper train, the Ghan is for you.  The two-day trip from Alice to Darwin – which can also be done in reverse or extended to Adelaide – includes a stop at the beautiful Nitmiluk/Katherine Gorge.  See journeybeyondrail.com.au/journeys/the-ghan/ </p>
<p><strong>HE HAS HIS OWN BREWERY </strong></p>
<p>Business is booming at the Alice Springs Brewing Co, where beers like Kolsch, IPA and even stout are all on tap.  Head Brewer Jum Ryan honed his craft at Little Creatures, so he knows what he’s talking about.  The pizzas are also very good.  See alicespringsbrewingco.com.au  </p>
<p><strong>ONE OF THE LARGEST IMPACT CRATERS IN THE WORLD IS NEARBY </strong></p>
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The crater of Tnorala Conservation Reserve (Gosse Bluff) on the horizon.

Tnorala (Gosse Bluff) Conservation Reserve is a place of international scientific interest and cultural significance to the indigenous people of the western Arrernte.  Located about 175 kilometers from Alice Springs, it is also the site of a huge crater.  Rising 180 meters above the desert, the crater has an astonishing five kilometers in circumference.  Much of the crater has eroded away, with the original crater bed now two kilometers below the surface.  PR image provided for Traveler.  Verify reuse.  20 things that will surprise new visitors to the Ute Junker story of Alice Springs.  NT Tourism Photos”  data-src=”http://www.smh.com.au/content/dam/images/h/2/5/1/t/t/image.imgtype.articleLeadwide.620×349.png/1657693702835. png” title=”” width=”100%”/> </p>
<p><cite><i>Photo: NT Tourism</i></cite></p>
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<p>Well, close as they measure things out in the backcountry.  It’s 175 kilometers to Tnorala Crater (Gosses Bluff), created when a comet crashed here 142 million years ago.  Originally 20 kilometers wide, the eroded crater still extends for 5 kilometers.  The best view is available from the Tylers Pass lookout.</p>
<p><strong>THIS DESERT TOWN HAS ITS OWN BOTANICAL GARDEN </strong></p>
<p>Australia’s only dryland botanic garden, the Olive Pink Botanic Garden contains 500 different plant species from Central Australia.  It’s also a great place to spot native wildlife: you can see anything from king parrots and butterflies to wallabies known as euros.</p>
<p><strong>AND WATER POINTS IN WHICH YOU CAN SWIM </strong></p>
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PR image provided for Traveler.  Waterholes fill the red center around Alice Springs.  Northern Territory Tourism Photos.  Ellery Creek provided the PR image for the traveler.  Water holes fill the red center around Alice Springs.  Northern Territory Tourism Photos.  Single use only Photo credit: Mark Fitz/Tourism NT

Photo: NT Tourism

Visitors are often surprised to learn that many of the nearby scenic waterholes contain enough water for you to enjoy. are good addresses to get started.

YOU CAN WATCH THE PREHISTORIC PALMS

Millions of years ago, central Australia was carpeted with lush rainforests. Head to Palm Valley to encounter the last survivors of the era, ancient stands of rare red cabbage palms.

AND ANCIENT MEGAFAUNA

The days when marsupial lions and giant 800-kilogram crocodiles roamed central Australia are long gone, but you can see fossils, illustrations and life-size replicas of some long-extinct creatures, including the bird of 700 kilograms known as Dromornis, in Megafauna Central.

YOU CAN MARVEL AT A NATURAL DAYLIGHT SHOW

Standley Chasm Angkerle Atwatye is considered a

Photo: NT Tourism

The 80m high gorge of Angkerle Atwatye, formerly known as Standley Chasm, is worth a visit at any time of the day, but if you can, get here at midday when the sun is shining directly into the throat, bringing its red and ocher tones. live.

OR A NIGHT LIGHT FESTIVAL

In April, the West MacDonnell Ranges provide the backdrop for a spectacular light show which is one of the highlights of the colorful Parrtjima Festival. Other illuminations bring the work of Indigenous artists to life, and the program also includes live music and lectures. See by rtjimaaustralia.com.au

AND STARBOOKING IS SECONDARY

If you like a bit of celestial spectacle, the clear desert skies allow you to see the stars in all their twinkling glory. On one of the astronomy tours at the award-winning Earth Shrine, you can see not only native and western planets, meteors and constellations, but also the vast sweep of the Milky Way that stretches above. of your head. See sanctuary-earth.com.au

AFTER

territorydunord.com/alice-springs-and-surrounds

discovercentralaustralia.com

The writer traveled as a guest of Tourism NT.


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